Reconciling Hope and History: The Question of Reparations

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University of North Carolina School of Law

February 16, 2002

This year's Conference will explore potential forms of redress for the historical injustices suffered by African Americans, Japanese Americans, Native Americans and WWII comfort women. Joining in the global dialogue, the Conference will provide a forum for evaluating reparations as a tool for fostering equal and inclusive societies.

The Conference is open to all. Organized by the Conference on Race, Class, Gender and Ethnicity. Additional support provided by the Black Law Student Association (BLSA) and the National Lawyers Guild.

Registration

Registration required. If you want to register offline, or would like more information, please email the Conference at crcge@yahoo.com or call Brandi Brown at (919) 918-7643. Registration is also available from 9:00-9:30 a.m. on the day of the conference. The Conference provides 4.75 hours of CLE credit for attorneys.

Registration Fees (lunch included in cost):

  • Students - Free
  • Non-Students - $20.00
  • CLE registration - $75.00

Read short descriptions of the participants in this year's conference.

Schedule

9:00-9:30

Registration and Breakfast

9:30-9:45

Welcome and Introductory Comments
Gene Nichol, Dean and Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law

9:45-10:30

Keynote Address: Philosophical Pespectives on Reparations
John McClendon, Professor of African American and American Cultural Studies, Bates College

10:30-10:45

Break

10:45-12:00

Panel
Moderated Debate on Slavery Reparations

  • Moderator: William Darity, Professor of Economics and Director of the UNC Institute of African American Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Adjoa Aiyetoro, Legal Consultant, National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (NCOBRA)
  • Adrienne Davis, Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law
  • John McClendon, Professor of African American and American Cultural Studies, Bates College
  • Robert Sedler, Professor of Law, Wayne State University Law School

12:00-1:00

Lunch

1:00-2:15

Breakout Session I (choose 1)

Affirmative Action and the Claim for Reparations
Robert Sedler, Professor of Law, Wayne State University Law School

Durban Conference and Reparations for Africa
John Calmore, Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law
Adjoa Aiyetoro, Legal Consultant, National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (NCOBRA)

Historical Supports for Black Reparations
Adrienne Davis, Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law

Can Reparations End the War on Drugs?
Alicia L. Young, Staff Attorney, Drug Policy Litigation Project, American Civil Liberties Union

Reparations for World War II Comfort Women
Elizabeth H. Cronise, Plaintiff's Attorney in Hwang, et al. v. Japan

2:15-2:30

Break

2:30-3:45

Breakout Session II (choose 1)

Japanese Americans and Redress in the Courts
William Hohri, WWII Internment Camp Survivor and Activist

Overcoming Procedural Barriers to Reparations
Adjoa Aiyetoro, Legal Consultant, National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (NCOBRA)

Reparations as a Complete Process
Jerome Culp, Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law

Reparations for Native Americans -- This session is CANCELLED. The Conference apologizes for the inconvenience.
Nell Jessup Newton, Dean and Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law

The University of North Carolina's Slave Heritage
John Chapman, PhD Candidate and Teaching Assistant, History Department, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Harry Watson, Professor of History and Director of the Center for the Study of the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3:45-4:00

Break

4:00-5:00

Question and Answer Session and Closing Remarks

Q & A Panel

  • Moderator: Professor John Calmore
  • Jerome Culp, Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law (tentative)
  • William Hohri, WWII Internment Camp Survivor and Activist
  • John McClendon, Professor of African American and American Cultural Studies, Bates College
  • Nell Jessup Newton, Dean and Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law --CANCELLED

Closing Remarks:
John Calmore, Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law

UNC School of Law | Van Hecke-Wettach Hall | 160 Ridge Road, CB #3380 | Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380 | 919.962.5106
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